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made-of-flowerrs:

And then I cried for hours because I want them all but have none ;-;

(via violetholiday)

Source: jenifajalouse
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mouth-two-mouth:

I want to tangle my limbs with your limbs

(via qbutch)

Source: mouth-two-mouth
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vintagemarlene:

vintage circus performer (www.trinketstreasures.blogspot.com)
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queerliness-designs:

Avocado brooch or patch.

All hail the avocado!

This cute felt avocado brooch will look so tasty on your jean jacket or back pack!

Hand stitched with cotton thread. Safety pin fastening.

(via queerliness)

Source: etsy.com
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pattiocleavis:

Diana Slip lingerie, 1930.

(via thiscorrosion)

Source: hollyhocksandtulips
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fatbodypolitics:

For those who are unaware, Joumana Kayrouz is a badass. 

Just a few days older than 50, Joumana Kayrouz may offer one of the most compelling portraits of the American Dream that southeast Michigan has to offer. In the midst of the 30-year Lebanese civil war, she arrived in the United States with $1,000 in her pocket, half a college education and limited English language skills. Since then, she has built the second-largest personal injury law firm in Michigan, employing about 70 people, including a large team of lawyers. It’s the only major personal injury law firm in Michigan owned by a woman, and wields an advertising budget of approximately $4.3 million dollars a year. She holds a degree in ethics from Yale University, speaks four languages — English, Arabic, French and Italian, and is flawless in all but the last — and metro Detroiters can see her face on more than 750 billboards and buses, the wallpaper of the city. 
She is probably also the most visible Arab-American in southeast Michigan — an area of the world with one of the largest Arab populations outside the Middle East. She’s been a trailblazer in her profession, one traditionally dominated by white Jewish men, and to many who know her, she’s a quiet feminist icon. She serves as a cultural ambassador between Lebanon and the United States, and is an enormous donor to progressive politicians, especially those who advocate for the rights of women. She gives approximately 20 percent of her wealth to charity, tithing in accordance to her profoundly felt religion, and serves as a role model to many in the legal profession and the immigrant and Arab-American communities in Detroit.

fatbodypolitics:

For those who are unaware, Joumana Kayrouz is a badass. 

Just a few days older than 50, Joumana Kayrouz may offer one of the most compelling portraits of the American Dream that southeast Michigan has to offer. In the midst of the 30-year Lebanese civil war, she arrived in the United States with $1,000 in her pocket, half a college education and limited English language skills. Since then, she has built the second-largest personal injury law firm in Michigan, employing about 70 people, including a large team of lawyers. It’s the only major personal injury law firm in Michigan owned by a woman, and wields an advertising budget of approximately $4.3 million dollars a year. She holds a degree in ethics from Yale University, speaks four languages — English, Arabic, French and Italian, and is flawless in all but the last — and metro Detroiters can see her face on more than 750 billboards and buses, the wallpaper of the city. 

She is probably also the most visible Arab-American in southeast Michigan — an area of the world with one of the largest Arab populations outside the Middle East. She’s been a trailblazer in her profession, one traditionally dominated by white Jewish men, and to many who know her, she’s a quiet feminist icon. She serves as a cultural ambassador between Lebanon and the United States, and is an enormous donor to progressive politicians, especially those who advocate for the rights of women. She gives approximately 20 percent of her wealth to charity, tithing in accordance to her profoundly felt religion, and serves as a role model to many in the legal profession and the immigrant and Arab-American communities in Detroit.

(via femmeanddangerous)

Source: fatbodypolitics
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goldstarbisexual:

everybody I know has used heterosexuality as a stepping stone to coming out of the closet as gay or bi, so I think we need to have a serious conversation about whether heterosexuality exists

(via cuntext)

Source: goldstarbisexual
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